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Phone: (920) 424-2030
Email: nasha@uwosh.edu
Sage Hall, Room 4610
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UW Oshkosh Sociology Course Descriptions

 

Sociology 101 3 (crs.)

Introductory Sociology (SS)(XS)(ES)

Orientation to the sociological perspective. Basic sociological concepts, research procedures, processes of human interaction, and social institutions.

Sociology 103 1-3 (crs.)

Honors: Introductory Sociology (SS)

Orientation to the sociological perspective. Exploration of basic sociological concepts, research procedures, processes of human interaction, and social institutions. Prerequisite: Enrolled in good standing in the UW Oshkosh  Honors Program and prior or concurrent enrollment in HNRS 175.

Sociology 111 3 (crs.)

Race, Ethnicity, and Society (XS)(ES)(SS)

This course is designed to cultivate and enhance your cultural and racial literacy through the employment of sociological perspectives. Broadly defined, sociology is an inquiry about the relationships between society and people, and in this course, the focus is on developing a sociologically-based intercultural and interracial knowledge and understanding. The course explores the ways in which social forces shape the ways we tend to think and act as social beings, the opportunities and obstacles that are unevenly distributed along racial/ethnic lines, and the consequences and implications of such inequities.

Sociology 151 3 (crs.)

Modern Social Problems (SS)

A study of major social problems confronting our society; personal and social disorganization, crime, juvenile delinquency, race and other selected problems.

Sociology 153 3 (crs.)

Intercultural Exploration of Families (XS)(ES)(SS)

This course examines the family system in the U.S. and across cultures, including the ways family structures both reinforce and challenge gender roles. Sociological and gender-based theories of the family are explored as well as the complex relationships among marriage, parenting, work, and family. Students will use ethical reasoning to navigate these relationships. Varieties of family experience are considered, with special attention given to issues concerning competing definitions of the family.

Sociology 203 3 (crs.)

Foundations of Sociology

This course is the first in the sequence of required courses for the Sociology major. It covers the major areas of sociology: theory, methods, core concepts, social institutions, and social change. The course emphasizes active learning through critical reading, writing, discussion, research projects, and presentations. It is designed for newly declared majors and for students considering a sociology major. It is required of all sociology majors and a prerequisite for most upper level courses.

Sociology 207 3 (crs.)

Social Processes and Social Structures (SS)

Human behavior in structured social situations. Classification of basic social forms and theories of social structures. Identification and analysis of major social processes as they operate within various social structures.

Sociology 209 3 (crs.)

Special Topics in Sociology (SS)

Application of sociological principles and procedures to current public issues or special topics in sociology. The topics studied will reflect areas of special demand or new developments in sociology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Sociology 261 3 (crs.)

Environment and Society (SS)(XS)

Examines relationship between social structure, culture and natural environments; compares different modes of production and cultural systems. Examines economic, political and ideological structures of industrial and industrializing societies. Analyzes the impact of these structures upon natural environments and analyzes the impact of natural environment upon these structures. Sociology 261/Environmental Studies 261/Political Science 261 Students may receive credit for only one of the three cross-listed courses. Special course fees may apply.

Sociology 275 3 (crs.)

Applied Sociology (SS)

This is a course about practicing sociology, involving a fieldwork experience in applying sociological principles and methods to everyday life, while learning more about careers in sociology and developing professional skills.

Sociology 281 4 (crs.)

Social Statistics

Basic descriptive and inferential statistics, including measures of central tendency and dispersion, interval estimation, hypotheses testing, and measures of association. Introduction to computerized statistics using SPSS for Windows. Prerequisites:  Math 104, 107, or PBIS 187, 188, 189 with a grade of C or better or placement at a level higher than Math 104 via the math placement exam.

Sociology 301 3 (crs.)

Sociological Theory: Classical and Contemporary Perspectives

The course surveys the major sociological theoretical traditions, both classic and contemporary, exploring their historical contexts as well as their relevance to current issues in Sociology. The connections between early major European and contemporary U.S. and international theorists will be explored in an analysis of key areas of sociological inquiry. The course will cover theories framed by both classical theorists such as Durkheim, Marx and Weber as well as more contemporary theories and theorists such as Parsons, Merton, Mills, Goffman, Blumer, and Hochschild (among many others. Prerequisites: Soc 101, 151 or 203 or consent.

Sociology 303 3 (crs.)

Classical Sociological Theory (SS)

Sociological theory from the European Enlightenment to 1930.  Prerequisites: Sociology 203 (with a grade of C or better in each), and a declared major in sociology.

Sociology 305 3 (crs.)

Contemporary Sociological Theory (SS)

Sociological theory since 1930. Prerequisite: Sociology 203 (with a grade of C or better in each), and a declared major in Sociology.

Sociology 307 3 (crs.)

Propaganda and Public Opinion (SS)

A study of the ways in which attitudes and beliefs are influenced in modern society by means ranging from mass media to interpersonal influence.  Public opinion measurement.  Propaganda techniques.  Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 309 3 (crs.)

Teaching Practice in Sociology (SS)

This course number is reserved for students serving as teaching assistants. Students are permitted to take the course for credit twice (maximum of 6 units (crs.). Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 311 3 (crs.)

Sociology of the Modern City (SS)

For the first time in history, more people in the world now live in urban areas than rural areas. This course explores urban places and urban people, in historical context and via current affairs, from our largest cities to the local level. It focuses in particular on these topics that impact urban places: suburbanization and sprawl; stratification, immigration, community, and organizations; population diversity, hop-hop culture, and racism; and, politics, globalization, planning and environmental issues. Cross-listed: Sociology 311/African American Studies 311. Students may only receive credit for one of the two cross-listed courses.  Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor. Special course fees may apply.

Sociology 313 3 (crs.)

Rural Sociology (SS)

In recent decades, our world has become an urban one, yet rural places remain sociologically interesting. This course covers topics including community, agriculture, immigration and demographic change, consumption and the environment, and modern life in rural Wisconsin. In particular, it explores two important trends taking place in the rural U.S., including Wisconsin: the rise of large-scale industrialized agriculture and the simultaneous increase in popularity of community-supported agriculture and small-scale farms. Sociology 313/Environmental Studies 313 Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor. Special course fees may apply.

 

Sociology 315 3 (crs.)

Population Problems (SS)

How many people, of what kind, are where? How come? And so what? These questions are often tied to so-called population problems, and this course explores important questions like these, by studying fertility, mortality, and immigration in the U.S. and around the globe. Learning what these components of demography are, how to measure them, and what they mean is critical to not only understanding current affairs but also the future of human populations. Sociology 315/Environmental Studies 315 Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

 

Sociology 317 3 (crs.)

Sociology of Health & Illness

Patterns of health and illness related to social organization and institutions. Issues include the social aspects of physical and mental illness, health related to culture, social structure, class, race, gender and ethnicity, social constructions of the body, changes in patterns of health and illness over time, health organizations and the socio-economic basis of the health care system. Sociology 317/Social Justice 317 Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

 

Sociology 321 3 (crs.)

Social Psychology (SS)

The relationship of the individual to others, social groups, and society.  The development of personality and the self. Motivation, attitudes, communication, prejudice, and leadership.  (Sociology 321 and Psychology 205 may not both be counted toward the units (crs.) needed for graduation.)  Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

 

Sociology 325 3 (crs.)

Collective Behavior and Social Movements (SS)

Collective Behavior provides an analysis of spontaneous, emergent and transitory behavior in relatively unstructured social situations. Social Movements considers formation and dynamics of collective efforts to change or maintain the status quo or to return to some antecedent state. Sociology 325/Social Justice 325 Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.  Strongly recommended: Minimum of 6 units (crs.) in Sociology.

 

Sociology 327 3 (crs.)

Sociology of Religion

Religion as a fundamental institution in society including diverse cultural systems combining meaning, practice and organization. Trends in participation in organized religion, beliefs and values. Sociological comparisons of communities and organizations, social movements related to change, and structures of power and authority. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 331 3 (crs.)

Social Stratification (SS)

Systems of hierarchical ranking in American and other societies.  Castes, estates, and social classes.  Stratification theory.  Significant American studies of social class structure, power and mobility. Sociology 331/Social Justice 331 Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 335 3 (crs.)

Social Gerontology (SS)

An analysis of the phenomena of growing old. Primarily for upper division students who have interests in working in some area of social gerontology. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 337 3 (crs.)

Work, Industry, and Occupation (SS)

Social organization of work including history and variety of work experiences, relationship to other social institutions, impact of technology and megacorporations, discrimination, unemployment, future of work.  Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 339 3 (crs.)

Sociology of the Family (SS)(XS)

The course examines the family system in the U.S. and elsewhere, including the ways family structures both reinforce and challenge gender roles. Sociological and gender-based theories of the family are explored as well as the complex relationships among marriage, parenting, work, and family. Varieties of family experience are considered, with special attention given to issues concerning competing definitions of the family. Cross-listed: Women’s and Gender Studies 339Sociology 339. Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 342 3 (crs.)

Social Ecology (SS)

Social Ecology: n1: a coherent radical critique of current social, political, and anti-ecological trends. 2: a reconstructive, ecological, communitarian, and ethical approach to society. As concerns about environmental problems have arisen in recent decades, people have increasingly recognized that what appear to be environmental issues are actually social in origin. This course examines various theoretical perspectives and practical approaches to these issues, with a focus on “going local.”  Prerequisites: Sociology 101, 151, 203 or consent of instructor. Special course fees may apply.

Sociology 347 3 (crs.)

World Systems and Global Inequality

Examines the relationship between core countries and peripheral countries. Consequences of the relationship for multi-national corporations and indigenous people. Discussion of development and maldevelopment. Relationship between private profits and the military. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151 or 203, junior or senior standing or consent of the instructor.

Sociology 351 3 (crs.)

Criminology (SS)

The study of criminal behavior.  Theories of causation and societal reactions to crime and criminals.   Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.  Strongly recommended: Sociology 151.

Sociology 353 3 (crs.)

Juvenile Delinquency (SS)

Varieties and extent of delinquency.  Causal explanation and research findings.  Programs for treatment of delinquents and prevention of delinquency.   Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 355 3 (crs.)

Social Control (SS)

A study of major aspects of social power; means and techniques of social control; and contemporary problems of social control in relation to individual freedom and liberation. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 359 3 (crs.)

Minority Groups (ES) (SS)

Racial and cultural minority groups in the United States, prejudice, types of discrimination and social processes in intergroup relations. Sociology 359/Social Justice 359 Students may receive credit for only one of the two cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 361 3 (crs.)

Social Networks and Organizations (SS)

Theoretical and empirical analysis of the role that social networks and formal organizations play in modern social life and society.  Prerequisites: Sociology 101, 151, or 203, or consent of instructor.

Sociology 365 3 (crs.)

Processes of Social Disorganization (SS)

Sociological and non-sociological conceptions, explanations and theories of social problems and of social control. Analysis of factors underlying social and personal maladjustment.  Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 368 3 (crs.)

Sociology of Gender (SS)

Analysis of the social construction of gender, which shapes the lives of men and women through the organization of roles or patterns of expectations related to order in society, including sex-typed behavior and self-expression, sexualities, the division of labor, the organization of households, parenting, power and gender-based forms of discrimination. Sociology 368/Women’s and Gender Studies 368/Social Justice 368. Students may receive credit for only one of the three cross-listed courses. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 369 3 (crs.)

Sociology of Deviance (SS)

Sociological conceptions of the nature of deviance, its origin, its control, and the social processes which define behavior as deviant. Fieldwork included.  Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 370 3 (crs.)

Sociology Through Documentary Film

This class will aid students in exploring and analyzing topics through the use of both documentary film and reading material. Students will employ both “sociological imagination” and critical thinking skills in making connections between film material and current issues. Prerequisites: Sociology 101, 151, 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 371 3 (crs.)

Sociology of Mental Disorder (SS)

Sociological contributions to the understanding of mental disorder and its treatment. Sociological theories and research dealing with epidemiology, societal stresses and social reactions to the problem. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

 

Sociology 373 3 (crs.)

Sociology of Law (SS)

The relationship between law and society; sociological analyses of the law in action. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 381 3 (crs.)

Social Research (SS)

Critical examination and interpretation of the research process.  Methods and theory used in the behavioral sciences in obtaining, interpreting, and presenting data.  Prerequisite: Sociology 281 (with a grade of C or better).

Sociology 382 3 (crs.)

Society Through Film (SS)

Films are employed to illustrate significant sociological concerns. Discussion of selected films is designed to promote critical analysis and insight into the social world in which we live and a critical analysis of films from a sociological standpoint. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor. Strongly recommended: 6-9 units (crs.) in Sociology.

Sociology 389 3 (crs.)

Sociology of Education (SS)

Includes a consideration of formal and non-formal education and of social factors that influence what is learned. The process of learning in interaction with others is considered. (Sociology 389 does not substitute for General Education 403)  Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

 

Sociology 407 1-4 (crs.)

Special Topics in Sociology (SS)

Application of sociological principles and procedures to current public issues or special topics in sociology. The topics studied will reflect areas of special demand or new developments in sociology.  This course is repeatable for credit, provided that it has a different subtitle and content for each enrollment. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

 

Sociology 446 1-3 (crs.)

Independent Study

See Independent Study under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements. Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

 

Sociology 456 1-3 (crs.)

Related Readings (SS)

See Related Readings under Course and Academic Advisement Policies information for general course description, general prerequisites, and proper contract form requirements.  Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 467 1-8 (crs.)

Internship in Sociology (SS)

This course is intended as a capstone course for Sociology Majors. Students must have a project supervisor from the Sociology Department and an approved internship. A supervised field experience accompanied by a sociological analysis of the germane interaction system. This course is repeatable for up to eight credits. Prerequisite: Sociology 275 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 474 1-6 (crs.)

Honors: Thesis (SS)

Honors thesis projects include any advanced independent endeavor in the student’s major field of study e.g., a written thesis, scientific experiment or research project, or creative arts exhibit or production. Proposals (attached to Independent Study contract) must show clear promise of honors level work and be approved by a faculty sponsor. Course title for transcript will be ‘Honors Thesis.’ Completed projects will be announced and presented to interested students and faculty.  Prerequisites: Sociology 101 or 151, or 203 or consent of instructor.

Sociology 481 3 (crs.)

Senior Seminar (SS)

This is a senior seminar focused upon the formation, completion and presentation of individual research projects which incorporate the skills and knowledge students have developed through their study of sociology. Seminar discussions, presentations and requirements will be centered upon these research projects. Prerequisites: Sociology 203, 281, and 381 (all with a grade of C or better), and a declared major in sociology.